In 1990 Peter Senge published “The Fifth Discipline” , giving a compelling vision of how companies could transform into learning organisations. The ideas chime with many L&D professionals, but adoption by business has been patchy. As both Towards Maturity and Bersin have recently launched reports on self-managed learning, it reminded me of a project I led on self-managed learning at the turn of the century which crashed and burned*/ was ahead of its time* (* = delete according how you kind you are). In the spirit of opening up things that didn’t go quite to plan so that others can learn from them, here’s the story, what I learned and why I believe self-managed learning is now ready to come back stronger. [click to continue…]

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Learning objectives are core tools of the trade in learning design. If you can state “By the end of this course/e-learning/other, a learner will be able to X”, you have a focus for your design and a means for reviewers to check that the learning journey will get to its intended destination. I’ve noticed in a few recent projects that clients have drafted learning objectives using the verb “understand”. This is contrary to what I was taught in my own learning design 101, but I could not Google up much to explain why learning objectives should not include understand. So I wrote this to help you if you get into the same debate. [click to continue…]

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Five more ingredients for compliance e-learning excellence

October 17, 2016

Once again I had the privilege to judge the e-learning awards (now called the Learning Technology Awards). When I last judged the compliance category two years ago I wrote Five ingredients for compliance e-learning excellence. It was great to see that many of the entries reflected these five ingredients and the general improvement in learner […]

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Let’s focus on the learning (with a little help from Cynefin)

June 15, 2016

I enjoyed a day out at the Learning Technologies Summer Forum yesterday. Like many conferences, there was no shortage of vendors trying to broadcast how their offering is the panacea to organisations’ performance problems. This noise about the channels of learning (“modality”) tends to distract from a far more significant consideration: What is the nature of […]

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Viv on Learning Now TV on 31 March

March 21, 2016

As an experienced blended learning designer and judge of the e-learning Awards (recently rebranded as the Learning Technologies Awards), I was invited to appear on TV. As part of the learning designers series, I’ve shared three key tips on blended learning design on LNTV.

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Professional Services e-learning Forum (PSEF) welcomes CLO of the year

March 4, 2016

Fresh from being awarded CLO of the year by the LPI, forum member Sarah Lindsell, Global & UK Director of Digital Learning and Learning Strategies at PwC, was the guest speaker at PSeF‘s 3 March meeting hosted by Deloitte.

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Escaping from the compliance e-learning cul-de-sac

October 29, 2015

Much of the e-learning that professional firms offer is compliance-based. The risk is that poor compliance e-learning ends up tainting learners’ expectations of e-learning (this is sometimes referred to as the “compliance e-learning cul-de-sac”). In an effort to promote better compliance learning as part of positively building organisations’ cultures of compliance, Towards Maturity and SAI Global […]

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The pitfalls of selling content online – five questions that training companies should ask

July 30, 2015

Imagine you are running a training company that has successfully carved out a niche. You’re selling lots of training courses and it’s only capacity that is stopping you from selling more. One day you realise that you could increase reach, lock out competitors and reduce cost of sales if you put some of the training […]

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Research says that whatever I say next will be a whopping lie

March 11, 2015

Over 15 years of working in L&D (and a dose of studying philosophy of science at university) makes me very alert to the phrase “research says”. It is usually followed by an unsubstantiated claim. After all, if you are making a claim that is backed by scientific research it is not hard to include a […]

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e-learning professionals “the cobbler’s children with no shoes”

December 24, 2014

At a recent Professional Services e-learning Forum, L&D teams were likened to “cobbler’s children with no shoes”. This allegory describes the phenomenon where professionals are so busy with work for their clients and their teams that they neglect using their professional skills to help themselves or those closest to them. A beautiful metaphor, but is […]

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